24 December, 2020 08:58

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My People

English Translation of the text
The most terrible chapter of the German tragedy in Yugoslavia
On Christmas 1944, all men between the ages of 18 and 45 and all women between the ages of 18 and 30, later up to the age of 35, were deported. They were evicted from their homes and sent by train in cattle carriages.
Our grandfathers of Swabian ancestors lived for centuries in ethnic German communities surrounded by other peoples, such as islands in the sea. They were far from their home country, but they firmly guarded their own identity, custom, and language. For centuries, they have remained untouched by political events in places of their original roots. For them, language was the only identity.
Everything changed when the winds of World War II flew over them, and in a few days they lost everything they had created for generations. After fleeing their place of birth, they were much poorer than when their ancestors arrived there 250 years ago. So once again they were left without everything, once again they had to start all over again.
Those who managed to escape before the Red Army invaded the Danube countries were happy. In Austria and devastated Germany they did not encounter hostility, but no one believed their stories of the wealth they had left behind. But of all the hardships and genocides against the Germans, the most cruel and terrible tragedy is the fate of our lost children in communist Yugoslavia. Today we know that between 40,000 and 45,000 German children under the age of 14 were sent to Tito’s camps, and at least six thousand (13 percent) starved to death.
Particularly cruel was the brutal taking of children from their mothers since almost all young women were sent as slaves to Russia. It is also documented that more than 20,000 children were taken from these camps and sent to orphanages throughout Yugoslavia. The brothers were separated, most of the children were given Slavic names and sent to areas far from the homes of their ancestors to meet a new ideology that would make them true patriots of Tito’s state. This process of renationalization runs counter to human rights and personal dignity according to the 1948 UN Declaration.
That was 73 years ago and now we can’t change anything. But it is our duty not to forget them. As the war took hold, our people advised the people to leave while they still could. In Slavonia and Srijem, where the peasants were closer to war exposure, most of the inhabitants fled to the west. Those accustomed to various natural disasters such as famine, loss of harvest, floods and earthquakes of various kinds, decided to stay because they thought better times would come. Of course, they assumed that political changes would end after the war, and for centuries they had successfully lived with the motto of loyalty to ethnicity and loyalty to the state.
As the Soviets occupied the Pannonian Plain, where more than half a million ethnic Germans lived, they left their fate to the Partisans. These partisans did not belong to a disciplined army, but to a rough group of bandits from the Bosnian and Serbian mountains who appropriated the property of ethnic Germans as spoils of war and did so.Were these partisans afraid of resistance? Of course not! Everyone was at the front, only women, children and the elderly stayed at home and had no means of resistance. On November 21, 1944, Tito’s administration in Belgrade announced the following:

  1. All ethnic Germans living in Yugoslavia since that day have lost their citizenship and citizenship rights
  2. All the property of persons of German nationality, movables and real estate was confiscated by the state on that day. With this law, 200,000 Germans in the Danube region remained outside the law. The Soviet leadership insisted that the Yugoslav government pay the costs for their occupation of the Danube region, or, as they said, “a free Yugoslavia.”
    Belgrade went bankrupt and could not meet those demands. Still, the Soviets persisted. If Belgrade could not pay in gold, it could pay the workers who were desperately needed in the war-torn Soviet Union. Paying workers? Now it was easy!
    All Germans were outlawed, they could take whoever they wanted. So they talked about labor benefits (Arbeitsverpflichtungen) and went to German places to gather workers. In the Banat town of Apatin alone, 2,400 women were deported to the Soviet Union, and in the whole of Banat, not counting women from Backa, Slavonia, Srijem and Bosnia, more than 40,000 women.
    On Christmas 1944, all men between the ages of 18 and 45 and all women between the ages of 18 and 30, later up to the age of 35, were deported. They were evicted from their homes and sent by train in cattle cars.
    They traveled for 17 days through the Russian winter to the mines in Kryvyi Rih and Stalin. In most cases, their children were left alone. What kind of nightmares did those mothers have, worried about their children? What kind of nightmares did they have deep in the mines that they couldn’t hear from their families? Only one in three women returned home. Home? He was not at home. They were sent to East Germany, broken and desperate. For them, a new difficult temptation (Leidensweg) began: the search for husbands, children and relatives.
    For children who were separated from their mothers, it was an unspeakable horror. That wound cannot be healed for the rest of your life. The lives of young children got a little better where there were older siblings who could take care of them.
    In homes where children were left alone, the kindness of neighbors eased the pain. Dependent on each other, the Germans have developed mutual solidarity in the past two and a half centuries of living among other nations.
    But now the partisans were masters, and no one was safe from their crimes. They gathered all the remaining Germans who were still there, children and the elderly, and put them in camps. Those who were able to work ended up in labor camps, and others in Tito’s most notorious death camps, such as Rudolfsgnad (Knićanin) and Gakovo. AVNOJ (Anti-Fascist Council of the People’s Liberation of Yugoslavia) planned that in three years (until 1947) not a single German would survive in the whole of Yugoslavia.
    According to statistics, by 1948, when most of the camps were closed, of the 200,000 German detainees, only a few tens of thousands remained alive. The White Death – so called famine – was an easy way for Tito’s administration to get rid of the Germans. Every day, a hole the size of a living room was dug into which the dead were thrown. The Belgrade system worked perfectly for them. The youngest children were the first to die. Father Wendelin Gruber from Filipovo (Bačka) spent some time in the Gakovo death camp as a prisoner. He visited the children’s quarters in the camp. About twenty children in each room lay on straw and were poorly covered. Only skin and bones, sick and infected wounds. No one cared about them. The survivors talked about an old man from Filipovo, a grandfather, who had gathered all his grandchildren. 28 of them ended up in a death camp. Erased people – L. Rohrbacher
    Another old man describes the situation of abandoned toddlers: “The children were sitting, crying, and if someone threw them a watermelon to eat, they would be happy the rest of the day.” By 1947, rumors of the camps had reached America and the Tito administration was finally forced to do something.
    They sought a “humanistic” way of dealing with children and decided it would be wiser to indoctrinate them into their own communist ideology. Toddlers three years and younger would not remember their names, their parents or where they came from, so they were sent to orphanages where they were raised to have an aversion to everything German.
    One of the children, Katharina Sesko, married to Mandel from Sekitsch (Lovćenac), wrote in her diary: “In the summer, carriages passed through the Gakovo camp and gathered all the children who no longer had relatives. We were brought to a house in Gakovo, where they other children were already waiting.
    A little later we were all taken away. We were brought to Stara Kanjiža. About 400 children from various camps were gathered there. We received our first meal of bread and milk in Kanjiža after such a long time.
    Seeing the bread, our eyes fell out. We were all grossly malnourished and starving, and a few of us were sick. We now got medical care and also had enough food. After we recovered, we were deployed with Serbian children to different orphanages, only a few ethnic Germans in each orphanage, to learn Serbian. I was in an orphanage in Sombor. “
    In an open letter in January 1950, Salzburger Nachrichten (Salzburg’s News) reported on the tragedy of 45,000 German children and their parents in Yugoslavia, but Eleanor Roosevelt, who was in charge of human rights at the UN, did not respond. In 1950, Professor Adalbert Gauss from Bačka described more than 40 orphanages, which he wrote about in the book “Kinder im Schatten” (“Children in the Shadows”).
    In his book, he claimed that they were brought up on the ideology that the state is their mother and father, to whom they owe absolute obedience. Edited by: Cornelia Brandt, prepared by: Željko Hamata, project editor: Ivan Ril
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Is the coast clear?

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Rider’s Rest

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DailyCards

Secret Of Now Daily Cards are the daily source of wisdom, to stay in present and be in bliss!
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DailyCards

Secret Of Now Daily Cards are the daily source of wisdom, to stay in present and be in bliss!
Download Now:
https://goo.gl/lTOkGw

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DailyCards

Secret Of Now

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Yeah and ?

SexyWomanSilhouette

Time heals?

Primal needs scream, yes

Like a flame over me

Wanting more, 

anticipating love

Bottom line;

It hurts.

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The Good Stuff

SunriseMornings here are magnificent, it truly is the Sunrise City and for that I’m extremely grateful. The spiritual connection that comes to me on the mornings I allow myself to sit and watch this day unfold are so uplifting, I truly feel the presence of Love. Love of all those I share my life with and all those I have Loved before. Along with all the hope the new day brings. “The promise of the coming day”.

Of course, the next thing I do I find myself reading some moronic tweet by the guy in the White House or some terrorist attack or another moronic adventure designed by the Wrong Wing of our government. As I hang on to the Promise. Best I can.

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Neglect of a Blog. Nah, it’s More than That.

You’d think I’d f***king learn. When I’m not journaling and not sharing here in the blogosphere something’s up, I’m telling you. By now I’d expect that blinding, mind numbing strobe lights would FLASH in my brain. But…. Nah, my thinking will usually give me enough rope to hang myself? Haha… Now what? I want to recommit myself to my “RANTS”. With the state of our nation and what’s going on in the world, a boy like me’s gonna RANT! Add to that the crap I heap on myself, love, lust, loneliness, finances, ad nauseam. I have to stay away from that side of the mind. It can get pretty dark in there.

Port Fierce Sunrise view from my new place

Since I sold the condo in Fort Pierce and moved into my little one bedroom on the banks of the Indian River (still in FP but close to downtown) my quality of life has greatly improved. Still struggling with issues with my hip replacement and nerve damage. Daily pain, no more narcotics, though. I’m now using a more natural alternative for pain. It far works far better, with no worries of addiction.

 

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